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VETERINARIANS

Lyme disease diagnosis.

Many dogs are affected by Lyme disease regardless of their access to endemic areas. Protect your patients with Lyme vaccines.

MAKING THE DIAGNOSIS

Diagnosis of canine Lyme disease can be very challenging and no single test result can confirm a diagnosis. Before Lyme disease can be diagnosed, these should be demonstrated:

  1. Evidence of exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi
  2. Clinical signs consistent with Lyme disease
  3. Positive serological test
  4. Other diseases are ruled out
  5. Response to treatment


DISCUSS THE DIAGNOSIS WITH CLIENTS

The clinical exam offers the opportunity to discuss canine Lyme disease with patients.

  1. Discuss any signs you have noted during the exam
  2. Ask pet owners to report any signs they see at a later date
  3. Discuss any other health concerns you note in the clinical exam
  4. If you suspect Lyme disease, discuss the importance of testing
  5. Probe for risk factors, such as geographic area the dog lives in or travels in, lifestyle, and contact with wildlife, even in the dogs own backyard
  6. Ask if ticks have been found during a tick check
  7. Offer vaccination to other dogs living in the home


EARLY DIAGNOSIS IS IMPORTANT

The greatest challenge to veterinarians is diagnosing Lyme disease early in its clinical course, when antibiotic therapy can be most effective. Complicating early diagnosis is that clinical signs may not express for 2 to 5 months post-infection and presenting signs may be misinterpreted as factors in other conditions and diseases.

CANINE RISK FACTORS


Learn the facts about how to assess risk by geography and exposure to deer ticks.


PREVENTION


Lyme Disease is largely preventable through tick control and vaccination. Get important details.


CASE STUDIES


Read about real dogs that were diagnosed with Lyme disease.