Geography

What is the Lyme disease threat in your area?

Since Lyme disease was discovered in humans in 1975 and in dogs in 1984, the disease in both humans and dogs has been spreading geographically. Human Lyme disease has been found in all 48 contiguous states.1

What area do you live in?


Where you live can help you determine the level of risk for your dog.

Geographic Area Disease Threat Know the Facts
Red Zone An endemic area — most dogs are at risk, and the threat is near-constant and pervasive – Lyme disease remains endemic in the Northeast and north-central United States
– Nearly 75% of unvaccinated dogs in this area will eventually test positive, and each year some will develop Lyme disease3
Orange Zone Many dogs at risk, and the threat is present to varying degrees – From 2005 to 2010, human Lyme disease  cases doubled or almost doubled in North  Dakota, Indiana, Wisconsin, Nebraska, and  West Virginia1
– Human cases have increased sharply in  Minnesota, Virginia, Oregon, and Illinois1
– Dogs in these areas can be sentinels for  Lyme disease in people
Yellow Zone Some dogs at risk, and the threat is present in some areas – Human Lyme disease has been found in all  48 contiguous states1
– Dogs are at risk in any area where human  Lyme disease has been diagnosed
– Dogs in these areas can be sentinels for  Lyme disease in people
– Clinical signs can be confused with many  other diseases
– If your dog travels to a red or orange  zone area, the risk increases significantly



For more geographic details on risk


Go to the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) website at petsandparasites.org. It has some helpful parasite prevalence maps that allow you to see the prevalence in your area for Lyme disease. Just follow this link: Parasite Prevalence Maps.

Canine Risk Factors


Learn the facts about how to assess risk by geography and exposure to deer ticks.

The Best Prevention


Lyme disease is largely preventable through vaccination. Get important details.

CASE STUDIES


Read about real dogs that were diagnosed with Lyme disease.